Monday, March 3, 2014

Earl Strickland~ "Earl Strickland The Story"




bujak19

Published on Dec 2, 2013

[FULL] - Earl Strickland The Story The greatest ever

Songs:
Bob Dylan - The times they are a changing (watchmen soundtrack)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xg9_Lx...
James Blake - Retrograde 
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Earl "The Pearl" Strickland (born June 8, 1961 in Roseboro, North Carolina) is an American professional pool player who is considered one of the best nine-ball players of all time. 

He has won numerous championship titles and, in 2006, was inducted into the Billiard Congress of America's Hall of Fame.[1] 

He is also known as one of the sport's most controversial players for his outspoken views and his sometimes volatile behavior at tournaments.


Earl Strickland


Early days

Strickland started playing pool at the age of 9. After intensive practice, he entered his first professional tournament aged 15.


Career

Strickland rose to national prominence in 1983 with a victory in Lake Tahoe.[2]

This was followed in 1984 by the Caesars Palace Pro Billiard Classic in Las Vegas.

According to sources, Strickland played "like a polished gem."

He was beginning to be a dominant force on the tournament trail and recognized as a future world champion.

He had the "skill, endurance, patience, temperament, and tenacity of which champions are made."[3] Because of his dominance, Strickland was named The National Billiard News Player of the Year in 1984.[4]

He won the 1988 World Open championship, after a momentous final confrontation between himself and Mike 'Captain Hook' Sigel".

A 45-second shot clock was used to monitor each shot because the tournament was being recorded for broadcast for a seven-week series.

At the conclusion, Sigel commented he could feel the pressure of being clocked. Strickland, on the other hand, said they "could have made it only 30 seconds between shots, and it wouldn't have mattered."[5]

At the 2004 Derby City Classic, a week-long multiple tournament event held every January in Louisville, Kentucky, Strickland was one of six competitors in a nine-ball ring game.

Veteran Grady Mathews, when introducing Strickland, says that when Strickland is in the house, "A hush ensues, and there is an expectation" due to his brilliant shot-making capabilities and unpredictable behavior.[6]

In May 2012, Strickland approached the Clann Eireann Pool Team with a view to signing a 2-year contract, although negotiations have now stalled pending a team discussion.


Awards and accolades

Strickland is a multiple winner of the prestigious Player of the Year Award,[7] and his career highlights include five wins at the U.S. Open Nine-ball Championships (more than any other professional pool player worldwide), and the WPA World Nine-ball Championships.

Strickland is the only WPA World Nine-ball Champion ever to win the event in consecutive years. He was also an ever-present player for the American team in the annual Mosconi Cup tournament, from its inauguration in 1994, up until 2009.

Strickland once ran 11 consecutive racks against Nick Mannino during the first PCA tournament in 1996 where there was a stipulation that anyone who could break and run 10 racks would win US$1,000,000.[8]

Jimmy Mataya, who was present at the event, witnessed Strickland's last shot, a tough nine-ball combination in which Earl showed no fear and "fired it in with authority" to win the prize.[6]

For 2007, he was ranked #6 in Pool & Billiard Magazine's "Fans' Top 20 Favorite Players" poll.[9]


Controversy

 

Strickland has engaged in exchanges with fans, players, referees, and tournament officials.

His 2003 World Pool Championship match with snooker star Steve Davis was particularly notorious.

Before the match, Strickland had given a particularly charged interview with a Sky Sports reporter, in which he complained that fans had been disrespectful to him (booing when his name had been broadcast over the PA), and that the event "revolves around Davis" (the event was organized by Matchroom Sport, which was headed by Davis's manager Barry Hearn, while Sky's coverage had featured Davis heavily to win an audience in the UK).

He also appeared upset that Sky Sports had shown numerous replays during the build up to the match of Davis beating him in the previous year's Mosconi Cup, the match which settled the event in favour of Team Europe.

During the match, Strickland entered the arena visibly downbeat, and after beginning the match in a quiet mood, Strickland soon began to engage in heated verbal arguments with fans and then referee Michaela Tabb.

TV microphones caught him using foul language to one member of the crowd, then telling Tabb to "shut up" when she reprimanded him.

In response, Davis made use of his entitlement to take a break in the match.

(Davis admitted later that the timing of this was intentional, leaving Strickland to the mercy of the crowd.)

 During the gap, Strickland put his fingers in his ears to block out the crowd's support for Davis, to the derision of the crowd, who mocked the gesture, and cheered loudly for Davis whenever Strickland took his fingers out.

 Late in the match, he responded to Davis' missing of an easy shot by sharply leaping out of his chair, fists aloft, shouting to the crowd "Yeah! He dogged it!" When Davis took a second break, Strickland loudly complained that players were only entitled to a single break, telling the crowd "He's Steve Davis, he can do what he likes," another reference to his belief that Davis's status at Matchroom Sport afforded him special treatment.

Strickland's tirade against Davis, the crowd, and the rules of the event, continued through the main part of a post-match interview, before visibly calming and apologizing for his behavior.[10]

After admitting regret over his reactions during the encounter with Davis, Strickland entered the arena for his next match carrying a bunch of flowers which he gave to Tabb by way of an apology, and proceeded to play in a much calmer manner for the remainder of the event.[11]

Davis would go on to liken his match with Strickland to his 1980s snooker matches against Alex Higgins, another player noted for his combination of impressive play and enigmatic behavior.


Mosconi Cup

At the 2006 Mosconi Cup, which took place at Rotterdam, Netherlands between December 7 and 10, the audience was loud, cheering and blowing horns when rooting for Team Europe.

During a match with Nick van den Berg, someone shouted from the audience for Strickland to "shut up" since he had continued talking while opponents were taking their shots.

The noise was so intense that referee Michaela Tabb warned spectators they could be thrown out of the arena if they persisted.[12]

Strickland broke his cue out of frustration during his match against Thomas Engert, smashing it against the floor after a failed attempt at a shot.

He replaced the broken shaft and went on to win the match 7-4.[13]

One year later, the 2007 Mosconi Cup in Las Vegas saw Strickland complain strongly about the misbehavior of European players and fans, reaching its peak in a particularly bad-tempered clash between himself and reigning world champion Daryl Peach where the referee (again Michaela Tabb) had to separate the two amid fears their animosity might turn violent.

Whereas most matches in the event were followed by live TV interviews with both players, Strickland refused to participate, while the normally mild-mannered Peach stated "Strickland is the scum of the Earth, everyone knows that." Given the opportunity to retract the statement moments later by the interviewer, he declined.

The next year, 2008, saw the Mosconi Cup played in Portomaso, Malta. Strickland's open night match again saw him repeatedly argue with European fans in the crowd, and also repeatedly comment aloud that the table was playing too easily.

In a post-match interview, he stated that it was bad for the sport if the public sees top players in a high profile event using a table that was clearly playing more easily than a standard club table.

When the crowd gave a mixed reaction to his comments, he turned to the spectators and attempted to rally them by calling "Do you want to see us have an easy time out here? Or do you want to see these guys shit on themselves?"

Presenter Andy Goldstein immediately apologized to viewers, an action that prompted Strickland to further argue that such language is acceptable, citing Tiger Woods as a fellow sportsman who has used such language on TV without being challenged.

Asked about the possibility of banning Strickland from future events for his behavior, Matchroom Sports founder Barry Hearn stated he would always want Strickland to participate in the firm's events, since his presence "guarantees drama and unpredictability."

Strickland, though, would be dropped by the USA team for the 2009 Mosconi Cup and was not selected again for the next three years before returning to the team in 2013.

Source:Wikipedia

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Saturday, November 2, 2013

Pool Hotties~ "Shoot to Thrill...Play to Kill"


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Hong Kong, 1996 - Efren Reyes Battles Earl Strickland~ "The Color of Money"

jayrecto
Uploaded on May 4, 2009
Hong Kong, 1996 - Efren Reyes battles Earl Strickland for US$100,000 in a race to 120 challenge match dubbed the Color of Money.


Efren Reyes
Efren Reyes in the World 9-Ball Pool Championship.jpg
Born August 26, 1954 (age 59)
Angeles City, Pampanga, Philippines
Sport country  Philippines
Nickname Bata (Kid)
The Magician
 
Reyes was born in Pampanga in 1954. He moved to Manila with his family at the age of 5. In Manila, he worked as a billiards attendant at his uncle's billiards hall, where he started learning the various cue sports. Because he was not tall enough to reach the pool table, he played while standing on Coca-cola cases that he moved around. At night, while he was dreaming of playing pool, the pool table was his bed.[citation needed]
He is called Bata, which is Filipino for "Kid", because there was another older pool player named Efren when he was young. To distinguish between the two, he was referred to as Efren Bata.
 Gambling from a young age, Reyes played three cushion billiards in the 1960s and 1970s. After establishing himself as a winner, he was discovered by promoters. This gave him the opportunity to compete in big time tournaments.

During the 1980s, when Reyes was considered a top-class player in his homeland but not yet internationally recognized, he went to the U.S. to hustle. Popular legend claims that Reyes earned US$80,000 in a week; this feat made him a folk hero back home.[1]

Reyes began winning a number of tournaments in the U.S., Europe and parts of Asia. Thus, he started to gain attention and recognition worldwide. At the start of his career, he used aliases to hide his identity so he would be allowed to compete. By the mid-1990s, he had become one of the elite players of the Philippines, alongside Jose Parica and Francisco Bustamante.
 Although Strickland was the first to win the WPA World 9-ball Championship, Reyes, in 1999, became the first to win while it was broadcast on television. This tournament was not recognized at the time by the WPA, but Reyes was later retrospectively acknowledged as the winner of one of two world championships held in 1999. Nick Varner won the "official" world title. The two tournaments were merged for the following year, with both men listed as the champion for 1999. At the time, the Matchroom Sport-organised event in Cardiff, Wales, was called the World Professional Pool Championship (despite the entry of many non-professional players).


Earl Strickland

 Earl "The Pearl" Strickland (born on June 8, 1961, Roseboro, North Carolina) is an American professional pool player and was inducted into the Billiard Congress of America's Hall of Fame in 2006.[1] He is considered one of the best nine-ball players of all time. Earl has won numerous championship titles within a 25-year time span, and also one of the most controversial, for his often-outspoken views and sometimes volatile behavior at tournaments.

Source: Wikipedia

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Monday, April 15, 2013

Johnny Archer vs Charlie Williams~ At the World 14.1 Tournament

InsidePOOLmag
Published on Sep 6, 2011
Johnny Archer vs Charlie Williams at the World 14.1 Tournament in New Brunswick, NJ. The $35,000 added event was hosted by the Hyatt Regency Hotel and took place August 29 through September 2, 2011.

Dragon Promotions produced the World 14.1 Tournament and the Straight Pool Hall of Fame banquet which inducted Jerome Keough and Ray "Cool Cat" Martin.



Johnny Archer (born November 12, 1968 in Waycross, Georgia) is an American professional pool player. He is nicknamed "the Scorpion" (his zodiac sign is Scorpio, and one of his sponsors is Scorpion Cues). On June 8, 2009, Johnny Archer was nominated to be inducted into the Billiard Congress of America Hall of Fame.[1]

Early days 

Archer grew up with his two brothers and two sisters in Twin City, Georgia, and began playing pool at the age of 12.[2]

Career

He is one of the most successful nine-ball players of the past two decades, having won the majority of the game's major tournaments at least once, culminating in his being named Billiards Digest Player of the Decade at the end of the 1990s. Archer is a two-time WPA World Nine-ball Champion, winning in both 1992 when he defeated Bobby Hunter, and later again in 1997 after beating Lee Kun-fang of Chinese Taipei (Taiwan).
 
Johnny Archer in 2008 with one of his many devoted fans.

He was also a runner-up the following year, losing in the final to Takahashi Kunihiko of Japan. He was the 1999 US Open champion, and has won over 60 professional tournaments throughout his career.

He has also been a regular on the successful US Mosconi Cup team, having joined them a record fifteen times, winning on nine of those occasions.

The US's only losses with Archer in the roster came in 2002, when they were beaten 9-12 by Europe, 2007, when Team USA lost 9–12, in 2008 when Team USA lost 11-5, and in 2011 when Team USA lost 11-7. He has captained the American side since 2004, retaining the Cup on each occasion until the 2007 upset (the 2006 event was a 12–12 draw in Rotterdam, Netherlands with the US retaining the trophy on account of being the current holders of it).

In 2003, one of Archer's most successful years, he won tournaments such as Sudden Death Seven-ball[3] and the first World Summit of Pool.[4]

Archer also won the 2006 US$50,000 winner-take-all International Challenge of Champions by defeating Thorsten Hohmann in the finals.[5]

In 2007, he won the Texas Hold 'Em Billiards Championship. While in the 2005 event, the entire purse was awarded to the winner, in the 2007 event, the purse has been split.[6][7]

The Ripley's Believe It or Not! television show, on September 3, 2003,[8] pitted Archer and Jeremy Jones against each other in an challenge match in speed pool.

 The show had them timed against each other, to try to beat the record, which at that time stood at 1 minute 30 seconds[9] to break a full rack of balls and then pocket all fifteen balls, and then move to another table and do it again. Archer was the victor.

The event was recorded in a warehouse in Los Angeles where other challenge matches were also taking place to beat records.

Archer has recently[clarification needed] rejoined the staff of Inside Pool Magazine, where he writes a monthly instruction column.[10]

For 2007, he was ranked #3 in Pool & Billiard Magazine's "Fans' Top 20 Favorite Players" poll.[11]


Titles and achievements

 


Personal life

 Archer lives in Acworth, Georgia, and is also an avid golfer. Archer ascribes his strong pool break to playing a lot of golf, noting similarities in having the timing right and using one's whole body in the stroke.[12] Archer also has had two children with his wife Melanie. He co-owns Marietta Billiard Club in Marietta Georgia

Source:Wikipedia

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Mike Sigel vs Jose Parica~ At the World 14.1 Tournament

Published on Sep 6, 2011
Mike Sigel vs Jose Parica at the World 14.1 Tournament in New Brunswick, NJ. The $35,000 added event was hosted by the Hyatt Regency Hotel and took place August 29 through September 2, 2011. 

Dragon Promotions produced the World 14.1 Tournament and the Straight Pool Hall of Fame banquet which inducted Jerome Keough and Ray "Cool Cat" Martin. 


Mike Sigel (born July 11, 1952) is an American professional pool player[1][2] nicknamed "Captain Hook." He earned the nickname from his ability to hook his opponents with safety plays.[3]

Sigel has won over 102 major pool tournaments, including 3 US Open Nine-ball Championship tournaments and 5 world pocket billiard championship titles. Sigel was named "Player of the Year" three times by Billiards Digest and Pool and Billiards, pool industry trade magazines, and in 1989, at the age of 35, was the youngest ever to be inducted into the Billiard Congress of America Hall of Fame.[4] He was ranked number 5 on the Billiards Digest 50 Greatest Players of the Century.


Early life

 Sigel is Jewish, and was born in Rochester, New York.[1][2][2][6] His mother Ruth was aggravated with him at times, because as she said "he wouldn't go to Hebrew school because he was too tired from playing pool nights."[7]


Professional career

Sigel became pro in the early 1970s at the Johnson City, Illinois, All-Around Tournament, under the auspices of pool players like Joe Balsis, Steve Mizerak, Ray Martin, and Irving Crane.[8] Sigel has the ability to shoot pool both left-handed and right-handed.

In 2005, Sigel won the IPT World Eight-ball Championship, a challenge match between him and Loree Jon Jones.

The victory earned him $150,000.[9] That same year, he was seeded in the final of the King of the Hill Eight-ball Shootout, the next event of the IPT. There he met Efren Reyes, who played his way through the tournament. In the match, Reyes bested him with little trouble. Reyes took home $200,000 and Sigel got $100,000 for second.[10]

He played himself in the movie Baltimore Bullet. He was also the technical advisor, instructor, and sports choreographer for the shots made by Paul Newman and Tom Cruise in the Academy Award-winning film The Color of Money.[11]

Today, he lives in Frederick, Maryland, and his focus is to play pool, and instruct.

Sigel was a dominant player in the 1980s and has been on the cover of numerous trade magazines such as Billiards Digest, Pool and Billiards, InsidePOOL, Billiard News, and Bike Week. He has been featured in Sports Illustrated, Life, People, NY Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Playboy, Parade, Baltimore Magazine, Orlando Sentinel, Silver Screen, and Cigar Aficionado.[12]

In December 2010, Sigel launched his official web site dedicated to giving lessons and offering Mike Sigel Cues and Cases to the public.[11]


Halls of Fame

 Sigel was inducted into the Rochester Jewish Sports Hall of Fame,[6] and in 2011 was inducted into the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.[2]

 
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Inaugural champion
US Open Nine-ball Champion
1976
Succeeded by
Allen Hopkins
Preceded by
Louie Roberts
US Open Nine-ball Champion
1980
Preceded by
David Howard
US Open Nine-ball Champion
1983
Succeeded by
Earl Strickland

Source: Wikipedia

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Efren Reyes vs Manny Chau~ "Jay Swanson Memorial" 9Ball Tournament [2012]


Uploaded on Feb 24, 2012
Manny Chau isn't afraid to take on the "Magician" in this match videotaped at the 16th Annual Jay Swanson Memorial 9-Ball Tournament @ Hard Times Billiards, Bellflower, CA on February 5th, 2012.

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Efren Manalang Reyes, OLD, PLH (born August 26, 1954) is a Filipino professional pool player and a two-time world champion.


Efren Reyes
Efren Reyes in the World 9-Ball Pool Championship.jpg
Born August 26, 1954 (age 58)
Angeles City, Pampanga, Philippines
Sport country  Philippines
Nickname Bata (Kid)
The Magician


Biography

Early life

Reyes was born in Pampanga in 1954. He moved to Manila with his family at the age of 5. In Manila, he worked as a billiards attendant at his uncle's billiards hall, where he started learning the various cue sports.

Because he was not tall enough to reach the pool table, he played while standing on Coca-cola cases that he moved around. At night, while he was dreaming of playing pool, the pool table was his bed.[citation needed]
He is called Bata, which is Filipino for "Kid", because there was another older pool player named Efren when he was young. To distinguish between the two, he was referred to as Efren Bata.

Career

Gambling from a young age, Reyes played three cushion billiards in the 1960s and 1970s. After establishing himself as a winner, he was discovered by promoters. This gave him the opportunity to compete in big time tournaments.

During the 1980s, when Reyes was considered a top-class player in his homeland but not yet internationally recognized, he went to the U.S. to hustle. Popular legend claims that Reyes earned US$80,000 in a week; this feat made him a folk hero back home.[1]

Reyes began winning a number of tournaments in the U.S., Europe and parts of Asia. Thus, he started to gain attention and recognition worldwide. At the start of his career, he used aliases to hide his identity so he would be allowed to compete. By the mid-1990s, he had become one of the elite players of the Philippines, alongside Jose Parica and Francisco Bustamante.

Reyes' fame began when he won the US Open Nine Ball Championship in 1994 by defeating Nick Varner in the finals. He was the first non-American to win the event.

Two years later, Efren Reyes and Earl Strickland were chosen to face each other in an event called the Color of Money, named after the movie. The event was a three-day race-to-120 challenge match of 9-ball. It was held in Hong Kong, with a winner-take-all prize of US$100,000. Reyes won the match 120-117. This was the largest single-winning purse in a pool event.[citation needed]

Although Strickland was the first to win the WPA World 9-ball Championship, Reyes, in 1999, became the first to win while it was broadcast on television. This tournament was not recognized at the time by the WPA, but Reyes was later retrospectively acknowledged as the winner of one of two world championships held in 1999.

Efren Reyes posing with fan after he won a historic US$200,000 at the 2005 IPT King of the Hill Shootout


 Nick Varner won the "official" world title. The two tournaments were merged for the following year, with both men listed as the champion for 1999. At the time, the Matchroom Sport-organised event in Cardiff, Wales, was called the World Professional Pool Championship (despite the entry of many non-professional players).

In 2001, Reyes won the International Billiard Tournament. The event was held in Tokyo, with over 700 players and a total purse of ¥100M ($850K). Reyes dominated the event and beat Niels Feijen in the finals 15-7 and earned the ¥20M[2] ($170K) first prize. At the time, this was the biggest first prize in a pool tournament.

In 2002 he won the $50K winner-take-all International Challenge of Champions, defeating Mika Immonen in a deciding rack after both players split sets.[3]

Near the end of 2004, Reyes beat Marlon Manalo to become the first-ever WPA World Eight Ball Champion. With the win, he became the first player in WPA history to win world championships in two different disciplines.

In December 2005, Reyes won the IPT King of the Hill 8-Ball Shootout. Reyes won a record-breaking $200K for first place by beating fellow Hall of Fame member Mike "the Mouth" Sigel two sets to none (8-0 and 8-5).

In 2006, Reyes and Francisco Bustamante represented their country as Team Philippines in the inaugural World Cup of Pool. They defeated Team USA, Earl Strickland and Rodney Morris, to capture the title.
That same year, Reyes won the IPT World Open Eight-ball Championship over Rodney Morris 8-6. He earned $500K which was the largest prize money tournament in the history of pocket billiards. Unfortunately, due to IPT's financial problems, he has not been able to claim much of this money as of 2007.[citation needed]

In 2009, the Filipino tandem of Efren Reyes and Francisco Bustamante beat the German pair of Ralf Souquet and Thorsten Hohmann by a grueling 11-9 score to take their second championship title. This, together with the semifinal finish of the other Filipino team of Ronato Alcano and Dennis Orcollo, was the best performance by a host nation in the tournament's history.

In 2010, Reyes clinched his fifth title in the 12th annual Derby City Classic as the overall champion, making him the most successful player in the tournament's history.

He has topped the AZ Billiards Money List five times: in 2001,[4] 2002,[5] 2004,[6] 2005[7] and 2006.[8] In 2006, he set a record by earning $646K in a single year.

 Nicknames and aliases

Reyes is often called by his nickname "Bata" (Filipino for "Kid"), given to him by friends at his regular pool hall to distinguish him from an older Efren.

Reyes, along with the other "Filipino invasion" players revolutionized the way pool is played by their introduction to the sport of pinpoint precision kicking (going into a rail with the cue ball and then hitting an object ball).

Reyes' ability to "kick safe" and to kick balls into intended pockets is legendary. This ability, coupled with his superb skill at other aspects of the game, led U.S. professionals to give him the appellation "The Magician." Before Reyes and his compatriots came over to the U.S., no one there had seen anything like their kicking skill set.[14]

"[The] first time I came over to the states, I used an alias of Cesar Morales. Pool players in the US already knew Efren Reyes as a great shooter from the Philippines, but they [hadn't]...seen...[me]...in person." — Efren Reyes[15]

Source: Wikipedia

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Advanced Pool Lessons~ "Biggest Secrets Revealed"


tor lowry
Published on Dec 17, 2012
http://www.zerox-billiards.com The SECRETS to a Perfect Stroke - Aiming - 9 Ball - Position Play - Download this video to your mobile device or computer by going to http://www.zerox-billiards.com/pool-l.... Everything from proper fundamentals (bridges, grip, stance, aiming, addressing the ball)

The Compact Stroke - The Most Powerful Stroke in Pool, Center Ball Positioning and 9 Ball Positioning, PLUS - Cool shots you never knew existed - the Masse English shot and the Impossible Bank shot. Also, the SECRET to Cut Shots and Masse English. Also - for more videos on 1 Rail Kicks, 2 Rail Kicks, 3 Rail Kicks, and Bank Shots - go to http://www.zerox-billiards.com

He has Video at his Website I would look into these if you want to improve your game.

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